The Internet needs to accelerate your download: MIT and Google know how

Barcelona, 14 March 2015.- According to the publication NiemLab: “MIT researches have designed a system that decreases loading time for website by 34 percent”. This report highlights:

Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have designed a new system that, in experiments, to cut down on load times for webpages by 34 percent (the median percentage decrease found in a range of tests). They’re calling the system Polaris: it’s a “dynamic client-side scheduler that is written in JavaScript and runs on unmodified browsers” (that is, not specialty browsers like Amazon Silk or Opera Mini).When loading a page, to browser recordings and evaluates objects – HTML files, JavaScript, CSS, fonts, images – then loads them in some order, defined both by how the code is structured and the browser’s own internal rules. To complex page might require several “trips” across a network to fetch all this data, and these multiple trips are not carried out very efficiently. As the paper explains: “Thus, loading to webpage requires a browser to resolve to “dependency graph”; this partial ordering constrains the sequence in which a browser can process individual objects. Unfortunately, many edges in a page’s dependency graph are unobservable by today’s browsers. To avoid violating these hidden dependencies, browsers make conservative assumptions about which objects to process next, leaving the network and CPU underutilized.With Polaris-enabled page, however, the system figures out how to more efficiently load to page by relying on a more accurate dependency graph, reducing the number of network trips. This graph of three sites shows how Polaris reduces pageload times (average reductions relative to baseline loading times)”.The code hasn’t been made available publicly yet, but the researchers are figuring out how best to release it for general use, according to a spokesperson.

Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP)

all the information on the Accelerated Mobile Page is located at: AMP Project 

AMP is a way to build web pages for static content that render fast. AMP in action consists of three different parts:

  • AMP HTML.
  • AMP JS.
  • Google AMP Cache

AMP HTML is HTML with some restrictions for reliable performance and some extensions for building rich content beyond basic HTML. The AMP JS library ensures the fast rendering of AMP pages HTML. The Google AMP Cache (optionally) delivers the AMP HTML pages. AMP HTML is basically HTML extended with custom AMP properties.Though most tags in an AMP HTML page are regular HTML tags, some HTML tags are replaced with AMP-specific tags (see also HTML tags in the AMP spec). These custom elements, called AMP HTML components, make common patterns easy to implement in a performant way. For example, the amp-img tag provides full srcset support even in browsers that don’t support it yet. Learn how to create your first AMP HTML page.

AMP JS

The AMP JS library implements all of AMP’s best performance practices, manages resource loading and gives you the custom tags mentioned above, all to ensure a fast rendering of your page.Among the biggest optimizations is the fact that it makes everything that comes from external resources asynchronous, so nothing in the page can block anything from rendering.Other performance techniques include the sandboxing of all iframes, the pre-calculation of the layout of every element on page before resources are loaded and the disabling of slow CSS selectors.To learn more about not just the optimizations but the limitations, read the AMP HTML specification.

Google AMP Cache

The Google AMP Cache is a proxy-based content delivery network for delivering all valid AMP documents. It fetches HTML AMP pages, caches them, and improves page performance automatically. When using the Google AMP Cache, the document, all JS files and all images load from the same origin that is using HTTP 2.0 for maximum efficiency.The cache also comes with a built-in validation system which confirms that the page is guaranteed to work, and that it doesn’t depend on external resources. The validation system runs a series of assertions switch confirming the page’s markup meets the AMP HTML specification.Another version of the validator comes bundled with every AMP page. This version can log validation errors directly to the browser’s console when the page is rendered, allowing you to see how complex changes in your code might impact performance and user experience. Learn more about testing your AMP HTML pages.

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